Upload Videos to Google Docs

I saw yesterday on the Google Docs Blog that you can now upload and view videos in Google Docs. I saw an immediate use for this as so many schools don’t want to upload to Youtube, Teachertube, Vimeo or any of the other video storage and streaming sites. So I gave it a try to see how the video would look and what the privacy and sharing settings would be.

It’s as easy to upload a video file to Google Docs as any other type of file. Actually, if you haven’t been in your Docs account in a while, you’ll get a pop-up (shown here) notifying you of the new feature.

You can upload videos up to 1 GB in size. Please note that the video will not be viewable immediately. I uploaded a  43 mb video and it took less than 5 minutes for Google to convert it. (You will need Flash in order to view it.  (Sorry iPad users.)

Here are the supported file formats listed in the Google Help Forum:

  • WebM files (Vp8 video codec and Vorbis Audio codec)
  • .MPEG4, 3GPP and MOV files – (h264 and mpeg4 video codecs and AAC audio codec)
  • .AVI (many cameras use this format – typically the video codec is MJPEG and audio is PCM)
  • .MPEGPS (MPEG2 video codec and MP2 audio)
  • .WMV
  • .FLV (Adobe – FLV1 video codec, MP3 audio)

Either before or after you upload your video, you have the chance to select the Security Settings. You can make the link completely public, completely private, or choose to share it with selected people only. I chose “Anyone with the link” so that you could see how the video would look. (By the way, this is my application video from 12/06 for the Google Teacher Academy.)

I think this is going to be a great alternative for uploading and sharing videos. Give it a try and let me know how you are using it.

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NEIT2010 – Croudsourcing

One of the Ignite sessions last night at NEIT2010 was about Croudsourcing. I ultimately will link to the presentation resources, but they are not yet posted. The gentleman who presented on the topic mentioned how he croudsourced his purchase of his glasses and his Halloween costume  as well as many other educational-related things.

I thought back to my Keynote from earlier that day and how different it might have been had I crowdsourced. I have somewhat of an idea of the suggestions from the group here as we worked on a public Google Doc to flesh out the list of ten skills that every student should have when they leave you.

Here’s a sampling of what the group came up with:

1 – Knowledge of reference sources

  • It seems best to consider a first-stop reference source that is age and skill appropriate and google scholar is not necessarily the tool for K-12
  • Students need to learn how to evaluate their sources.
  • There can be legitimate but biased websites.

2 – Who is the authority?

  • teaching skills to question & evaluate authority
  • snopes.com
  • Straightdope.com

3 – Digital Citizenship and Ethical use of information

4 – Where you can go to stay current? (This is a lengthy list on the Google Doc)

5 – Personal Learning Networks

  • Message Boards (i.e. Apple Discussions)
  • Social Content Aggregators (Digg, reddit)
  • Podcasts (i.e. Ed-Tech weekly)
  • Magazines (i.e., Teacher-Librarian Magazine, WIRED)
  • Professional organizations

6 – Who are your teachers? Who are your mentors?

  • Members from professional organizations
  • Do our schools have formal mentoring programs? If so, do they work?

7 – Always contemplate responding and interacting with content

  • Many of the responses will be inappropriate and many will respond inappropriately.  Who is to decide?
  • What happens when they pretend to be someone else?
  • Classroom forum or are we now working with a broader audience?
  • Time and energy is wasted policing instead of concentrating on the real content.  Who is  in charge of going back through and giving approval?

8 – You are a content producer

  • More people can produce content – and this allows people to publish content without thought to accuracy.
  • The idea of thoughtful content producers.
  • Students need to contemplate whether their content is constructive, responsible, part of a larger conversation.
  • An understanding of intellectual property

9 – How to manage your sources, notes, creations in the Cloud

  • What do you put in the cloud? Issues of privacy.
  • Problem of ownership, such as e-mail.

10 – What’s in the pipeline? (This is a lengthy list on the Google Doc)

 
The general consensus was that I should have included what I’ve listed here as number 11
11. Internet Safety (Managing your digital footprint)

  • http://www.digiteen.org/
  • http://www.commonsensemedia.org/
  • http://www.kidzui.com/ – friendly place for kids – kid-only content including games, videos, etc – a kid browser – commercial venture, but seems quite usable
  • How to surf the web filterless?
  • How to consider what to share – safe sharing
  • Digital footprints? Who teaches our kids what this is? Who provides the leadership on this?
  • Smart = Safe
  • Community effort – everyone has to be part of this educational process, including parents
  • Help our students create a digital footprint under our mentorship – this will provide them with a positive presence on the web, perhaps countering their Facebook presence

I’m in no way suggesting that I croudsource my next presentation, but it was a new learning experience for me to immediately hear what other educators thought and for them to discuss it from their perspective. Thanks to everyone who participated.

Major updates to Google Docs

Back in October, I posted about some of the updates Google had made to Google Docs. Well, today they rolled out some additional features that I thought you might be interested in.

The one that is most important to me is that Google Docs will now allow you to see other Collaborators changes in real-time as they type. This may sound familiar to you if you are a Wave user, but what it sounds like to me is the chat feature that so many of us have been requesting in this app. You can get a peak of this character-by-character real-time function in the video below.

Additional features that you may be interested in are:

  • Creating collaborative drawings from the Docs list rather than only from within a Google Doc
  • Increased speed in Docs, so you should be able to edit with up to 50 simultaneous users (rather than the actual 10-12 synchronous users that most of us have experienced)
  • You’ll notice a ruler within your document for help with adjusting margins
  • Additional ease with moving images and formatting your documents

For additional information on the Google Docs improvements check out the Google Docs Enterprise Blog.

Online Communities for Students

I’ve been working with a group of high school teachers that have very little technology available to them. They each have a tablet computer and a projector and that’s pretty much it. There are no other computers in the room and there are no wireless laptops or laptop carts available to bring in for the students to use. We’ve built our time together on making the most of the one computer classroom. So, as I blogged about in the beginning of the year we focus on using the tablet PC as a presentation tool, a productivity tool, and a tool for the students to use during small group activities and even during whole group instruction.

The more time we spend together, the more this small group of teachers sees how their students would benefit from using technology on a regular basis. They have begun using web 2.0 applications that the students can access from home so that they are incorporating technology into their curriculum – more – just not really in their physical classroom. So the questions of building virtual learning communities for students has come up. I even Tweeted about the other day. Here are the responses I received:

kyteacher @lthumann Either Ning or Edmodo. We use both, depending on the assignment.

Taml17 @lthumann Depending on what types of comm and how much, I might look at a wiki first.

khokanson @lthumann we are having GREAT success with ning at my school as digital portfolios HOWEVER monitoring is KEY!!!!

MagistraM @lthumann most of my colleagues in FL dept have gone with Ning for flexibility and broad potential.

keisawilliams @lthumann Is it around a project? Or do you want something more Twitter-like?

courosa @lthumann that’s what I’m using.

jepcke @lthumann What age students? What type of communication? Ongoing? Community building? For a project/unit?

kristenswanson @lthumann Depends on the purpose and the size of the group…. ;0 Maybe NING, maybe Edmodo, maybe a plain ‘old wiki… ;0

Dsalvucci @lthumann Edmodo.com does not require email addresses to join, easy to use and very secure.

keisawilliams @lthumann Have you seen Twiducate? I haven’t tried it yet. http://www.twiducate.com/

kyteacher @lthumann Then I would recommend Edmodo.

keisawilliams @lthumann Take a look at Kidblog too http://www.ncs-tech.org/?p=4726

sharnon007 @lthumann u can petition ning to remove ads if used for ed w/kids

amandacdykes @lthumann what about edumodo (sp?) I just know ning is blocked at my school.

beacantor @lthumann have you looked at nicenet.org? A bit rudimentary, but very easy to set up and monitor.

keisawilliams @lthumann Using the SMC technically and pedagogically http://socialmediaclassroom.com/index.php/using-the-smc Have the tchr watch this vid.

kmulford @lthumann: Edmodo, hands down.

lesreilly @lthumann Curious as to what you went w/ as far as student comm. Nigh or basic blog or wiki or maybe google group? What feedback did U get?

nsharoff @lthumann – I would suggest Moodle (FREE) for MS teacher & students

digitalmaverick @lthumann Moodle has an incredibly supportive community – try @iusher for brilliant examples of its use in many schools

kmulford @lthumann: Edmodo is like Facebook for the classroom. The interface is appealing to kids, yet it is “protected” and much safer.

kmulford @lthumann We have “reluctant learners” who don’t do any homework, but WILL spend time on Edmodo talking to classmates and teachers.

urselle @lthumann How about Edmodo, Google Docs, Hotchalk for students to communicate. Ning is very easy, though.

Bear in mind that many of these Tweets are in response to my responses to their questions. You can certainly go back and view my responses at http://twitter.com/lthumann, but the crux of what I was Tweeting was that the teacher wanted the ability to moderate, has no e-mail addresses for his students and I originally was researching for a middle school teacher who I will be seeing next week, but I remembered that I would be seeing a high school teacher who also wanted to pursue building an online community with his students.

Here’s the list of possible community building tools that I was able to put together thanks to my Twitter network:

  • Moodle – “Moodle is a Course Management System (CMS), also known as a Learning Management System (LMS) or a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). It is a Free web application that educators can use to create effective online learning sites.”
  • Ning – Ning is an online platform for people to create their own social networks
  • Edmodo – “A private social platform for teachers and students to share ideas, files, events and assignments.”
  • Twiducate – A free resource for educators for teachers and students to continue their learning outside the classroom.
  • Hotchalk – HotChalk provides a free online learning management system, a library of free and premium digital content, and a portal into today’s educational landscape with innovative articles and the latest news
  • Google Docs – Safely store, organize, share and collaborate on documents, spreadsheets and presentations online
  • Blog – “is a type of website, usually maintained by an individual with regular entries of commentary, descriptions of events, or other material such as graphics or video.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog)
  • Wiki – is a website that allows the the editing of any number of web pages via a web browser There are typically multiple editors on a wiki site. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki)
  • Google Group – Groups provides a method for true communication and collaboration with group members
  • Nicenet.org – Nicenet is a volunteer, non-profit organization dedicated to providing free services to the Internet community. Nicenet’s primary offering, the Internet Classroom Assistant is designed to address the pedagogical needs and limited resources of teachers and their students.
  • Kidblog – Kidblog.org is designed for elementary and middle school teachers who want to provide each student with their own, unique blog.

When I met with the High School (science) teacher on Tuesday I told him that I had a plethora of ideas for him but that he needed to be clear as to what the objectives of an online community for his students were. This is what he laid out:

  1. A place for the teacher to house resources and documents from class
  2. An alternative way for students to submit assignments. (Currently many of them e-mail them to him.)
  3. A place for students to communicate with each other in a supportive manner with regards to course content.

Well, this was a start. I was happy to demonstrate some tools that would fit these three objectives knowing the teacher was clear as to what he was trying to accomplish. But our last hurdle was going to be the district filter. So immediately we were able to eliminate several of the online applications listed in the Tweets above.

Our ultimate decision was to sign up one of his classes on Edmodo. Edmodo appealed to this teacher and met his objectives. Fortunately, Edmodo was not blocked by the district’s filter (yet…) and the bonus was that it came highly recommended from my PLN.  Edmodo seemed to be our best choice.

It will be interesting to see the objectives from the middle school teacher next week to see if we select the same tool.

Do You Have a Handout for That?

I recently spoke at a conference where the anticipated attendance was 16,000. There were 30 laptops set up with 60 seats and then overflow seating for another 40 people. I gave 5 presentations over 2 days. I didn’t know before I got there how many people I was going to see and now that I’m home, I still don’t know. But I can tell you that at least 10 people asked me if I had a handout I could give them. There were also many attendees that commented about it. I was grateful to see this Tweet from NJ educator Brian McLaughlin.

brian

I think sometimes as educators, we are accustomed to getting everything on paper. But what really happens to it? We stick it in a folder, we throw it away, or it gets lost in a an ever-growing pile of papers collecting on our desk.

Here are some tools that I’ve been using and have seem some other educators use to share information and resources during presentations and professional development sessions:

Google Docs
Click on Share — Publish as Webpage and Google Docs will assign you a unique public URL (link) for your document. You still will be the only one that has rights to edit your Google Doc, unless you invite Collaborators, but you can use this feature to share a digital agenda, list of links, or anything that you would have printed out in the past. Here’s a sample… http://docs.google.com/View?id=ddn2z86w_3dn2hs4fj

http://www.scribd.com/
On Scribd, you can upload a Word or PDF file and they will convert it into a web document. This way your attendees have access to it on their computers. All you have to do is share the URL  with them. Here’s a sample…http://www.scribd.com/doc/17245218/Discovery-Education-Whats-New-2009

Wikis
http://www.wikispaces.com/
http://sites.google.com
http://pbworks.com/
Wikis will allow you to embed more than one type of content on them. Like I did for my presentations at the NJEA Convention, I included links to websites, embedded videos and gadgets to PollEverywhere and Slideshare. These are pieces of information you really can’t print out. Here’s a sample… http://njea-tis-09.wikispaces.com/shoestring-did-you-say-that-was-free

Glogster
Glogster advertises itself as “a creative, dynamic, and innovative digital outlet that captures learner’s excitement for online creations, keeps learners engaged in course content, and makes teaching and learning more fun.” This is great, but to summarize, it allows us to provide our attendees (whether they are students or educators) with a digital resource rather than a printed one. Here’s a sample… http://udltechtoolkit.wikispaces.com/

Wallwisher
Wallwisher defines itself as a “web page where people actually post messages.” The great part about this is that you don’t need an account with Wallwisher in order to post a note on a Wall. So you can have the folks in your session contribute ideas or links to the wall and then save the URL to refer back to. There’s no need to print out anything during the workshop and run and go make copies as they’ll always have access to the information. Here’s a sample… http://wallwisher.com/wall/techforum09

Do you have any tools you are using with your students or in professional development to eliminate unnecessary handouts and to increase productivity? Please share them!