Smackdown at #EBC11

These are the sites that attendees shared at EdubloggerCon ISTE 2011. Each participant had two minutes to share the tool. I have to admit, many of these tools were new to me, so I am looking forward to jumping in.

Web 2.0 Smackdown
http://goo.gl/lvnLm

  1. ujam.com
  2. www.qwiki.com
  3. schooltown.net
  4. stencyl.com
  5. jotform.com
  6. jotform.com/dropbox
  7. notaland.com
  8. AnswerGarden.ch/
  9. scoop.it
  10. shapeways.com
  11. lucidchart.com
  12. screenr.com
  13. shmoop.com
  14. tildee.com
  15. gamesalad.com
  16. qwertytown.com
  17. class.io
  18. storybird.com
  19. mycybertwin.com
  20. isleoftune.com
  21. bo.lt/app/
  22. udltechtoolkit.wikispaces.com
  23. taggalaxy.de
  24. present.me
  25. skloog.com
  26. 3x3links.com
  27. popplet.com
  28. pixlr.com
  29. oneword.com
  30. weekinrap.com
  31. flocabulary.com
  32. iPad garageband and a paper guitar (use velcro)

The Ultimate Web2.0 Smackdown at Tech Forum, Boston

I was honored to be invited to present at the inaugural Tech Forum Boston yesterday. Just over 200 educators gathered at the Burlington, MA Marriott to learn together along with Keynote Mitch Resnick and presenters Patrick Larkin, Alice Barr, Samantha Morra, Kathy Schrock and countless others.

Dan CallahanJoanne Najarian and I facilitated the “Ultimate Web 2.0 Smackdown” and were joined by several educators including Karen Janowski and Valerie Beck as we spent no more than 3 minutes demonstrating the following tools:

Sites we smacked down:

  1. http:/goo.gl
  2. http://www.symbaloo.com/
  3. http://www.zooburst.com/
  4. http://abcya.com/animate.htm
  5. http://abcya.com/word_clouds.htm
  6. http://voki.com
  7. http://animoto.com/education
  8. http://www.facesoflearning.net/
  9. http://museumbox.e2bn.org/
  10. http://www.debate.org/
  11. http://www.paperrater.com/
  12. http://livebinders.com/
  13. http://www.tineye.com/
  14. http://www.qwiki.com/
  15. http://www.google.com/squared
  16. http://udltechtoolkit.wikispaces.com/
  17. http://www.uen.org/3-6interactives/
  18. http://audioboo.fm
  19. http://freedomshare.eu/
  20. http://www.khanacademy.org/
  21. http://reading.ecb.org/
  22. http://www.shmoop.com/
  23. http://www.youtube.com/user/SearchStories
  24. http://quietube.com/
  25. http://www.tubechop.com/
  26. https://www.readability.com/bookmarklets
  27. http://snipsnip.it/
  28. http://tenmarks.com/

Added via Twitter

  1. http://m.scribblemaps.com/#map
  2. http://www.jotform.com/dropbox/
  3. http://cooltoolsforschools.wikispaces.com/

There are a few new ones here for me and I’m looking forward to checking them out. Thanks to all that contributed both in person and virtually. ENJOY!!

Upload Videos to Google Docs

I saw yesterday on the Google Docs Blog that you can now upload and view videos in Google Docs. I saw an immediate use for this as so many schools don’t want to upload to Youtube, Teachertube, Vimeo or any of the other video storage and streaming sites. So I gave it a try to see how the video would look and what the privacy and sharing settings would be.

It’s as easy to upload a video file to Google Docs as any other type of file. Actually, if you haven’t been in your Docs account in a while, you’ll get a pop-up (shown here) notifying you of the new feature.

You can upload videos up to 1 GB in size. Please note that the video will not be viewable immediately. I uploaded a  43 mb video and it took less than 5 minutes for Google to convert it. (You will need Flash in order to view it.  (Sorry iPad users.)

Here are the supported file formats listed in the Google Help Forum:

  • WebM files (Vp8 video codec and Vorbis Audio codec)
  • .MPEG4, 3GPP and MOV files – (h264 and mpeg4 video codecs and AAC audio codec)
  • .AVI (many cameras use this format – typically the video codec is MJPEG and audio is PCM)
  • .MPEGPS (MPEG2 video codec and MP2 audio)
  • .WMV
  • .FLV (Adobe – FLV1 video codec, MP3 audio)

Either before or after you upload your video, you have the chance to select the Security Settings. You can make the link completely public, completely private, or choose to share it with selected people only. I chose “Anyone with the link” so that you could see how the video would look. (By the way, this is my application video from 12/06 for the Google Teacher Academy.)

I think this is going to be a great alternative for uploading and sharing videos. Give it a try and let me know how you are using it.

Spontaneous Professional Development

Tomorrow at the NJECC monthly meeting I’m going to speak for a bit about “Spontaneous Professional Development”. With the budget cuts in NJ schools this past year, many educators don’t have funding for PD. Our meeting this month will be about how schools are dealing with the cuts, what types of PD their districts are spending money on and of course, how we can harness the power of our networks to bring in free professional development virtually.

I hope I don’t put myself right out of business.

Here’s the slides I will be sharing along with a list of the resources I will be talking about. (Please leave a comment if you have others to add as we would all benefit from your resources.)

Feel free to follow the #NJECC hashtag on Twitter during tomorrow morning’s meeting.

Plan B for the HTH at the NJEA 2010 Convention

Boy was I surprised when I got an e-mail from Kevin Jarrett regarding one of my sessions at the High Tech Hall this coming Friday. He e-mailed me to let me know that one of the tools I was using, Drop.io was about to shut down. This was bad news for me as I was going to be talking about Drop.io for an entire hour. But, as we know, there is always another tool and it was an easy decision to go with Dropbox as a replacement.

How many times has this happened to you? Was there a website or a web app that you have used in the past that is gone now? What did you replace it with?

Miguel Guhlin asked the other day for tools to use in lieu of Wallwisher. Well, I had a whole list as I had intended to use Wallwisher a few times that week and each time I tried I got “There is a glitch in the matrix” as an error. Dan Rezac had also blogged about the same issue. We always need to have a plan B.

Please share your Plan B experiences on this Voicethread. Not only will it be interesting to see/hear how we have all have coped with our favorite sites going down, but I am going to be sharing this with the teachers that come to High Tech Hall this Friday at the 2010 NJEA Teachers Convention.  I think this will be a great example. Thanks in advance for your participation.

 

Web 2.0 Smackdown at TechForum

Source: http://members.more.net/

I was fortunate to present with Adam BelowHowie DiBlasi and David Andrade today at Tech Forum NY. We shared a Google Doc at the morning session of the Web 2.0 Smackdown.

After the lunch break,  Adam and I facilitated a session giving the participants time to show what tools they feel are useful in the classroom. The ideas started flooding in before we even met. They were coming in via Twitter, suggestions from the the morning group and folks that came to say hi after we were finished.

Here is the list of tools that was generated in our afternoon gathering:

  1. Evernote
  2. Rapportive
  3. http://www.pageflakes.com/Default.aspx
  4. http://only2clicks.com/
  5. http://www.symbalooedu.com/
  6. http://www.symbalooedu.com/
  7. http://www.3x3links.com/index.html
  8. http://cooltoolsforschools.wikispaces.com/
  9. http://tidyfavorites.com/
  10. http://apture.com/
  11. http://yolink.com
  12. http://www.sweetsearch.com
  13. http://4me.sweetsearch.com/
  14. http://books.google.com/
  15. http://www.shelfari.com/
  16. http://edutecher.com
  17. http://quietube.com/
  18. http://tubechop.com/
  19. http://www.yooouuutuuube.com/
  20. http://www.synchtube.com
  21. http://keepvid.com/
  22. http://zamzar.com/
  23. http://www.vuvox.com/
  24. http://aviary.com
  25. http://docsteach.org/
  26. Gmail Labs
  27. http://www.showdocument.com/ds/main.jsf
  28. http:prezi.com
  29. http://www.zotero.org/
  30. http://classmarker.com/
  31. http://ytinstant.com

Not only did Adam and I have fun sharing all of these tools with the attendees, but it was great to have folks share out what they like and how they use the tools for productivity and to help improve teaching and learning in the classroom.

A Non-Techie Resource: Bucket Fillers

If you Google “Bucket Fillers”, as I did when my 2nd grader came home talking about it last fall, the first link that you will most likely click on will be the  Bucket Fillers 101 site. It was here that I first read about the book by Carol McCloud and learned that this was about spreading love and good feelings towards others. For my daughter, at first, it was also about boosting her self esteem. She was coming home with little slips of paper (from her bucket) that said she was a good reader, that someone liked her shirt, that she had a nice smile. This did amazing things for her social well being as she was the new kid in her class and feeling very shy.

I asked Emma’s teacher if we could work on a project together documenting how the students used the buckets. The students would write the script for an Animoto, I would take the pictures, but they would creatively design poses that didn’t include any faces as we wanted to be able to share the video on YouTube.

This did amazing things for her social well being as she was the new kid in her class and feeling very shy.

In the meantime, I came to find that Bucket Filling was not such a unique concept. I heard Lisa Parisi and Maria Knee talking about it on Conversations. I saw that Scholastic had a post about it. I even found that countless educators had posted their lessons plans and resources using buckets in their classrooms.

So Mrs. Skaar from Evergreen Elementary School in Scotch Plains and I forged ahead. We set aside two blocks of time that I would work in the classroom with the students. She work ahead of time with them writing the script and then her student teacher and I helped them type everything into the computer. (They only had one computer in the classroom, so between my laptop and that one, we typed as fast as we could.)

You might ask why all of this?

I wanted to make sure that my daughter always remembered the lessons she learned in Mrs. Skaar’s class about being a Bucket Filler and not a Bucket Dipper. I saw the impact that it had on her and I wanted to create the video with the students so that they could look back and remember how it felt to read the little slips of paper. I also wanted them to share the experience with their families, so Mrs. Skaar sent the link to the Animoto to all the parents after we were finished.

Lastly, I encouraged Mrs. Skaar to share the project with her peers and I hoped that the video would encourage other teachers in the district to adopt Bucket Filling, or something similar, in their classrooms. Many of the students in the class expressed an interest in continuing with the program the next year, and I certainly could imagine both my children benefiting from boosts in self esteem and lessons in non-bullying behavior. Please watch their video and consider looking into their program if you don’t already do something similar with your students.