QR Codes in Everyday Life

House for Sale

I saw my friend and colleague, Kristine Scharaldi, yesterday and she shared an article with me that she had clipped out of the local newspaper. I got a real chuckle out of it. But on the way home, I started thinking about the topic some more and when I passed this house up for sale on the way to pick up my kids, I had to take a picture.

The topic of the article from Kristine was how some gravestone engravers are offering to add a QR-code for an additional fee.   What a great way to read, view and learn more about the person you are visiting if you have a smart phone.

Image source: http://a.abcnews.com

I’ve been using QR-Codes when I present as a way to quickly share the URL to the attendees. So far, most people would just assume have the URL, but there seems to be about 20% of the people that are happy to use their phones to scan the code. (My generator of choice is http://goo.gl/ because of all the statistics it provides.)

To learn about using QR Codes in school, you can also take a look at Tom Barrett‘s Interesting Ways presentation on the topic. Or view this video from McGuffey School District in Claysville, PA.

10 Skills Students Should Graduate With

Yesterday, at the NJEA Technology Integration Institute, I presented the morning Keynote. I shared ten skills I feel that students should graduate with. These skills don’t have anything to do with standardized testing, or memorizing facts, they are just what skills students need to be prepared for college and beyond.

  1. How to determine who is the authority on the Internet
  2. A knowledge of reference sources
  3. Good digital citizenship and the ethical use of information
  4. Where they can go to stay current
  5. Established personal learning networks
  6. Knowing who their teachers and mentors are
  7. To always contemplate responding and interacting with content
  8. That they are content producers
  9. Knowing how to be safe on the internet
  10. Being cognizant of what’s in the pipeline
I had many interesting comments after I was finished presenting. One that particularly stuck with me was about special needs children. Some teachers I spoke with mentioned that the parents of those students didn’t want their work out there for anyone to see. Have you or do you deal with this in your school?