Get Your Google Earth Going

There are so many innovative ways to use Google Earth with your students. Some of these may be familiar to you, but hopefully some are new and will help you improve upon a unit with your students.

Some of the educators behind these amazing projects are Thomas Cooper, Jerome Burg and Carol LaRow

Google Lit Trips
Each trip is an interactive multimedia experience created using Google Earth and stored as a KMZ file. (Although they may sound complex, KMZ files that run Google Earth are relatively easy to create and navigate.) Following Burg’s lead, teachers and students are creating their own virtual literary trips and sharing them with the online community.

Investigating Earthquakes Using Real Time Data
Students learn to how to integrate the use of real-time web-based technology in trying to solve a problem earthquakes cause scientists every day, earthquake forecasting.

Google Historical Voyages and Events
This site is dedicated to the explorers, voyages, events, and historical backgrounds of countries throughout the World. We’d like to hear about famous explorers who surveyed or traveled through your community long ago. Perhaps you’d like to tell us about historical events that shaped your locale or region. You may wish to report about a catastrophic event in your area. Or, you may want to tell us how your community was founded, its historical background, early settlers. Every community, every town, every country has a past, and we’d like to hear about yours.

Real World Math
This site is all about using Google Earth in the math classroom. Within this site you will find lesson ideas, examples, and downloads for mathematics that embrace active learning, constructivism, and project-based learning

Sally Ride Science Content for Google Earth
Take an educational tour through the universe beyond our own solar system with this preview of “It’s Astronomical!”, a series of books created and published by Sally Ride Science. Sally Ride Science is dedicated to fueling girls’ and boys’ interests in science, math and technology.

Google Earth Lessons
This site includes some how-to’s and lessons for your students in science, geography and math.

Google Earth Classroom Resources
From the folks at Google: popular methods to implement Google Earth in the classroom for a variety of subjects.

GoAPES Wiki
Thomas Cooper lists here the many collaborative Google Earth projects he has worked on with his students over the last few years.

I hope you find one or more of these projects and ideas helpful. I’m sure I missed many, so feel free to leave a comment with a link.

Shifting at Pinelands High School

I had the pleasure of presenting at Pinelands Regional School District earlier today. Some of the administrators there had heard me speak at the NJETI conference last spring and requested that I come to their district and speak with their teachers. The administration there is really looking to make a shift…

After the presentation, several of the teachers came up to thank me and to share with me their frustrations with filtering. This is something, I understand, the district is working to improve on.

Just to give you an idea of the tools we spoke about, here’s a sampling:

I know many of the educators who read this blog have dealt with these issues. One of my suggestions to the teachers was to list some of ways certain types of technology would improve teaching and learning in their classrooms.

What advice would you give to them?

Teachmeet NJ

Calling all NJ educators!

If you haven’t already registered, now is the time!

What is Teachmeet NJ?
A free conference for educators focusing on innovative practices in pedagogy, assessment, and technology integration.

Where will it be located?
(At the Center where I have worked for the last nine years!)
Rutgers University – Center for Mathematics, Science and Computer Education
SERC Building 118 Frelinghuysen Road Piscataway, NJ 08854

When is it going to happen?
8:00am-5:00pm on Saturday, March 5
Free Registration:
http://tmnj.eventbrite.com
Website:
http://tmnj.org
Schedule:
http://tmnj.org/schedule
Who is the conference designed for?
The conference is primarily geared towards teach-ers, administrators, and educators, although any-one who is interested in or concerned about educa-tion is welcome.
There will be sessions that are relevant to all posi-tions, content areas, and grade levels. The primary foci of the conference are:
· Effective Technology Integration
· Innovative Pedagogy and Assessment Practices
· Meeting the Needs of All Students

Innovative Format:
All sessions will be hands on and interactive. There will be 3 main types of sessions:
· 1-hour sessions and panel discussions that go in depth on topics.
· 15-minute sessions that are organized around a topic. These are fast-paced and expose edu-cators to many new ideas that they can imple-ment.
· 5-minute participatory sessions where mem-bers of the audience get to share their ideas on a particular topic.

Share in the experience – join us!

Broken Cookies Contain Fewer Calories

I have two Girls Scouts in my house. That’s twice as many cookies that have to be sold to meet their quotas. Twice as much prepping them to say “Thank you berry much” (ode to the new Thank U Berry Munch cookie.)

I was wondering how in the world the girls and I were going to meet their goals this year and then I saw my friend Erica Hartman post a Google Form for friends and family to fill out on Facebook. Shortly after that, I saw a neighbor of mine update her FB status to “Girl Scout cookies for sale”. Was this the route I was going to take with the girls? I wasn’t sure.

Well, we went out yesterday to sell to our neighbors. It started raining as we were out and the girls were getting whiny, but I told them we had to forge ahead as it was the time I had carved out to sell, sell, sell.

When we returned home, drenched, and far from our goal (we have wonderful neighbors, it’s just that most of them weren’t home), I updated my Facebook status to read…

"I was just out with the girls selling Girl Scout Cookies - determined - even in the rain to fill our quota. We didn't make it."

 

Well, I have an amazing group of friends, family and fellow educators because I immediately got orders for cookies. Some were from local family that I’d be able to deliver as soon as they came in and others were from ed tech buddies that I would see at ISTE11 and BLC11 I think there’s going to be a cookie fest at ed tech conferences this summer.

Now, please don’t take this post the wrong way. I am not looking for more orders (though the girls do want their badges). I just wanted to share another story about how using  social media can increase your reach.

(P.S. A favorite aunt of mine, long ago, had a magnet that read “Broken cookies contain fewer calories”. I still have it on my fridge. I’m sticking with it.)